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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
before another. and in this approximate silence we have felt that not regreting has spared us loneliness. called at the door. you did not tell me about these hours, how thick they were and wounded. i hear myself telling someone to punch me just to figure the order of my beliefs. someone else in my clothes who would view this and move on. explain again the conditions that will bring along the morning and what it is here that convenes the night. and then the last poem is called upon living. they shove your feet out of the smokestack kitchen. they narrow the big sea sba a line of your sweat and then they take away your last word and then they take away another. now you put the keys back in your pocket and now you push on the door until it is in flame, until it is in flame. next reader is jane herschfield. . >> one sand grain among the others in winter wind. i wake with my hand held over the place of grief in my body. depend on nothing, the voice advices, but even that is useless. my ears are useless, my familiar and intimate tongue, my protecting hand is useless that wants to hold the singl
friends. loneliness, you have fewer than one friend that cares about you on a bad day, your life expectancy drops eight year. but you go places, and people are in live long social networks where they commit to each other. if things go well for them, they share the wealth, and if something goes bad, someone has your back. i sat down with one of the groups, five 102-year-old women, and they're still there. >> psychologically, it's not as communal as maybe it was in times past here. >> so 15 years ago, the average american had three good friends. we're now down to about 1.5 good friends per person. we're watching over four hours of tv a day, and not enough good tv like this right here, but it's this interaction, which should be a uniform prescription doctors ought to be giving patients. we know that volunteers have lower rates of heart disease, lower bmi, and lower health care costs. >> everyone at home right now is counting their friends. it's always a joy to have you on the show, i think you make everybody happier as well. great to have you. >> thanks. >> a check of your top stori
teams to the home of justin bieber and ashton kutcher. >> it could be boredom, loneliness, out of desire to be noticed, if not by the immediate family, or not be noticed and get away with it. >> reporter: dr. crespo is a longtime psychologist. >> it would be difficult to conceive that there would be an understanding of all the consequences. >> reporter: the boy that allegedly created this chaos, whose name police haven't released, apparently hacked into the system, sending a message via a teletype machine. sources tell us the boy lived in southern california but not l.a. county. tmz is reporting the child lived in an apartment with his mother, is home schooled, and that they've been visited frequently by child services. >>> well, video of an eagle snatching a baby had a lot of people all over the internet pretty freaked out. >> is it real or is it fake? well, it's fake. we learned today that students at a production school in canada made the video for a 3d animation class. plus, bird experts say there's no way an eagle can lift a child. it's pretty realistic, though. >>> getting cold out
of that loneliness and reach out in a community. in many congregations, my own included, there are different services for different community groups. so there's a family service, there's a young person service. there's more musical service with a band, and it tells me that music has a sort of a hot line for people. they can't talk about god, use the word god, sometimes god talk is difficult but they can sing prayers and they can feel a connection that is different when you sing it as opposed to just reading the words or saying it out loud. and so i think a lot of synagogues are trying to cater to musical tastes of their congregations. there's a little bit of a danger in that in that we have a very rich tradition that unfortunately is falling by the wayside. and i feel it's my mission to be a bridge, to bring a contemporary service that speaks to people in the here and now, but not give up on our rich musical traditions which i think would be a great loss. >> some of the things that we're doing in my congregation is also putting intergenerational kind of activities. i don't mean programming, i mean in
between being alone and feelings of loneliness. these people said they felt, lonely, they are 64% likely to develop dementia according to this study? >> well, you know, you have to take a fine-tooth comb to this study. the study does say after looking at a couple thousand people in the netherlands over 65 who doesn't have full-blown dementia by any means when the study started, there is 64% higher risk for those who say i feel lonely at the beginning of the study, even if they're living with their families. the feeling of loneliness seemed to be associated with them later, years later, developing dementia. the trouble is, the participants in the study, the people who structured this, admit, we don't know whether these feelings were an early sign of dementia. so we don't know whether loneliness causes dementia or is early dementia defined by loneliness or feelings of loneliness. jon: right. people who are experiencing dementia might be embarrassed forgetting names and forgetting birthdays, and might limit social contact and feel lonely as a result. >> they might just feel lonely. they may
could not, of course or his threat would no longer be credible. talk about the loneliness. ike me all about the burden, from the north african campaign in 1943 to d-day to the conquest of germany, and the liberation of europe. ike smoke four packs a day as a general. he quit cold turkey in 1949. i gave myself in order to quit, he said. ike was pretty beat up, he had a major heart attack in 1955. a small stroke in 1957. the doctors worked about as high blood pressure were always ordering him to worry less. just what do they think this job is, he said? he tried to relax by playing golf. he played 800 times as president, a record. the golf may be the wrong game for perfectionist. ike can be pretty grim on the course and he wants to a chipping wedge at his doctor. ike had a huge temper which he kept hidden from the public but not his aides. his mother was a fundamentalist like to quote the bible and she would say to him, he that congress is old so is he -- ike would say his mother taught him how to control his temper. one of his aides said i thought what a poor job she had done. [laughter
them. he could not, of course, or the threat would not be credible. talk about the loneliness of command. ike knew about the command from the north after -- africa campaign, d-day, germany, and liberation of europe. ike smoked four packs a day as a general, quit cold turkey in 1949. he gave himself an order to quit, he said. he had a heart attack in 1955, and operation in 1956, a small stroke in 1957, doctors worried about the blood pressure and ordering him to worry less. what do they they the job is, he said? he tried to relax playing golf. he played 800 times as president, a record, but golf was the wrong game for a perfectionist. he was grim on the course, and once through a chipping wedge at a doctor, howard snyder, when snyder tried to make him feel better about a shot from the bunker. he had a tumper. his mother would quote the bible saying he the conquer their own soul is greater than he who takes a city. ike would say his mother taught him how to control the temper. one of the aids said i thought what a poor job she had done. [laughter] when he was mad, he was like te
a pattern. and what is that pattern? anger, loneliness, social awkwardness, and, of course, access to guns. and the number that brian referenced, 1 out of 17, underscoring that, only one-third of those people get any kind of mental health problem. so here's the real concern. less than 10% of our health care dollars are spent on mental healthcare. and that means that the very wealthy can pay out of pocket. the very poor, there's a little bit of a safety net with medicaid. and everyone in between basically falls through that safety net. and that's what really has a lot of people concerned today. one person who we spoke with, a father who has battled the privacy issues that sometimes bar parents wefrom getting acce to their kids' records said tonight, and i'm going to quote him. he said, "it's easier to get an assault rifle today in the united states than it is to get adequate mental health care and that's wrong." and i think speaking on behalf of parents like you and me and american citizens, you cannot disagree with that statement, brian. >> powerful quote. nancy, we'll continue to cover th
? >> bob: yeah. i wish they would go to church. it's great. >> dana: can i have the book the loneliness. nobody agrees with me. i have not convinced anybody. >> bob: let me give you a thought about that. sit right here, you will understand what it feels like. >> andrea: it's true. judges should have discretion but i think the discretion -- >> dana: that's the word i'm looking for. >> andrea: he is crossing the line. this is not adequate punishment. >> dana: that is right. >> bob: coming up, 71 years ago today japanese attacked pearl harbor and killed thousands of americans. a new movie hits theaters today that honors veterans of world warii. we'll do the same when we come back. ♪ ♪ >>> december 7, 1941, a date which will live in infamy. >> dana: today is the 71st anniversary of the attack on pearl harbor. japanese struck us to world warii. the nation remembers the fall an new movie hits theaters today that honors the veterans of the war and highlights the program that has been taking the same heros to see the world warii memorial in d.c. built in their honor. the movie is called "ho
personality. i wasn't able to i think convey dylan's depression and his loneliness, so i got that way myself. what i was trying to do was nod as if i were describing you and sit here and say you are in a chair and wearing a light blue shirt. what i tried to do is turn the camera around and be beside you and project what the world look like to you, what you were seeing and what you are thinking and what you are feeling and present the killers and all the characters in the book from his side and that is what i try to do. >> host: you said you got depressed when writing about dylan. how serious was it? >> guest: well, that was not actually the worst. the more serious was writing about the victims actually. i had a bout of secondary post-traumatic stress disorder which medical workers and sometimes cops get dealing with tragedies. i had to the first year. i got a relapse seven and a half years and when i wrote two of the most difficult chapters. i wrote the chapter about -- for over three years. coach sanders who was the heroic teacher who died saving children. and then died tragically and he wa
past. loneliness, isolation. i probably would have passed away. >> reporter: without this? >> yes. >> reporter: it keeps you alive? ivities i think is saved my life. >> reporter: jack the bike man making christmas in florida seem a little warmer. west palm beach. >>> keep your distance. i'll use it if i have to. >> "the hobbit" is number one, taking in 36.7 million. it beat out "jack reacher" which debuted at number two. this is 40, "rise of the guardians" and "lincoln" round out the top five. tomorrow is "less miserables" and with a look and preview of what's hitting the big screen, kim ser afin. so, les mis is getting the attention? >> yes. long awaited movie. everyone has been talking about this. hugh jackman is incredible in it, and of course anne hathaway is talking about her performance of "i dream the dream." she's already been nominated for s.a.g. awards. >> interesting about that film, too, is how they sang it live. it wasn't sung later or prerecorded. >> exactly. they didn't do these a month in advance and lip seven. they all had earpieces in their ears, listening to pia
a creature as fierce as it was tragic. its intense loneliness matched only by the fear it inspired far and wide. you see, the minotaur had a voracious appetite which can only be satiated with flesh. the king, who secured peace, the one who enabled trade to crisscross the seas with bountiful ships and spread prosperity around the world. alas, the beast's appetite could only be satiated by human flesh. every now and then by ship loaded with young slaves was bound to greece to deliver its human tribute to be devoured by the minotaur. a gruesome ritual that was essential for preserving the peace and producing trade and prosperity. many years later a global minotaur rose up from the ashes of the first postwar phase, the one created by america from the ashes of the war. it is there -- a form of labyrinth was greeted deep in the american economy. it of the form of the united states trade deficit which consumes the world's exports. the more the deficit grew, the greater its appetite for europe and asia as capital, and what made it truly global with its function. it took financial capital and s
of terror and loneliness. they're really appeals to god for meaning. the words that are put in jesus' mouth in mark, "why have you forsaken me?" it's... it's the religious power ofhe psalmthats really one of those wonderful moments of concrete continuity between what this... this very passionately religious first-century jew might have been thinking as he was dying this horrible death on the cross as the finale to this... this week of passionate religious excitement and commitment. and... and asking god what happened. >> the plaque that was nailed to the cross is one of the few clear pieces of historical evidence that we have. >> iesus nazereno, rex iudorum. >> the plaque, which names him as jesus, the king of the jews, suggests that the charge on which he was executed was one of political insurrection, a threat the pax mana. but he's also now a victim of the pax romana. >> narrator: in the year 51 of the common era, by the shores of the aegean sea, a visitor arrived at the greek city of corinth. his name was paul of tarsus. >> let's imagine paul going up the main street of corinth, through
of violence and that kind of loneliness and desperation that would lead someone to take these lives. it's really unspeakable. >> one of the most shocking statistics is that 40% of legal gun sales do not involve any kind of background check. >> right. >> that is astonishing. >> it's astonishing. these are the kinds of laws that can't be changed because of the stranglehold not only the nra, now we've got the koch brothers fund funded program in the mix. last night michigan passed a law making it legal to carry a concealed weapon in a church, in a school, in a daycare center and they also abolished the local county boards that were in charge of supervising the permits that do go out. so we've got these well-funded lobbies, these well-funded efforts to keep politicians on a short leash when it comes to any kind of common sense gun control, and so it's going to take a lot of courage on the part of the president but not just the president, everyone in congress and not just democrats, the nation. >> karen, you've worked previously for the new york education department. give us your perspective
"fervents of love", his great loneliness without her. "wishing myself," he says, "in my sweetheart's arms, whose pretty dukkys i trust shortly to kiss," "dukkys" being a term in henry's day for... well, use your imagination. what is that doing in the vatican library? >> collins: we don't know how they ended up here in the vatican. it may be that some spy, maybe one of my priestly predecessors, may have stolen these letters and brought them to rome to present in the case if a trial was made for henry's request for a divorce. >> safer: but the church refused to let henry divorce catherine of aragon so he could marry anne. he married her anyway, broke with rome, and took control of the church of england. the country was largely converted to the protestant faith. >> celenza: this is one of the moments in the 16th century that leads to the fracturing of christianity, and to much of the bloodshed and the wars that, especially, the later 16th century was known for. >> safer: as man explored the planet, a scientific revolution was also underway. by the mid-17th century, navigators had mapped much
common thing in high schools. so the shooter is a much bigger tip of the iceberg in loneliness and rejection and most people get past it and go on past high school, but those who suffer a particularly, treatment form of mental illness take every slight as a magnified catastrophe and it means something more serious to them than to the ordinary kid that gross out of it and doesn't enjoy it either. >> is there a threshold or an age if it's not dealt with at that time that this person will only get worse and it will fester and turn into something like this, a violent rampage? >> we know these mental disturbances that often characterize shooters begin in adolescence and they're very difficult to identify at that age, but if they manage to make it to their 20s it becomes a more fluid form that we are able to identify and that's one of the hardest things about this particular shooting and once someone gets beyond high school where we see them in a social setting it could be much harder. >> katherine newman, appreciate it. >> robert f. kennedy's daughter weighs in on the gun control de
again. to end my terrible loneliness. i miss you doug. she signed it b. it's a great way for people to write their own personal messages. we have people from panama and dallas. happy new year rick folbaum. i guess we are starting to celebrate new year many eve already. when they do finally get in the heart of the square there is no out. there is no bathrooms. so from 3:00 to 12:15, that can get pretty scary. we madder all sorts of things for what they are going to use to help them out. rick: i think you just made the howard stern show. >> reporter: i couldn't hear anything. rick: it happens to the best of us. before we let you go. how many apple carts are you standing on? report very just one, but it's a big one. so one big one. then actually in front of it is our space heater which we are not using anymore. that how we kept warm from 5:00 this morning. you just called out my height, 5'1". i'm never taller than anyone else. arthel: she is having a good time out there. you will be saying good-bye to an old standby in the new year. the popular lightbulb that will soon disappear from s
is dealing with some darkness or loneliness or some doubt. we have the opportunity to be an element of kindness and encouragement to people. let's not forget we all have the opportunity to do that with the people in our circle as well. >> heather: i heard this tossed around a lot, a description of not being the commander in chief but taking the roll on as the comforter in chief. do you think that should be the first priority? >> he has done that. that is why i said i'm not sure words are important or he should even speak. people want to see the president is there and he can reach out to people and comfort them and be there. he listens to them that he hears them, that is what i think we wanted to see for ourselves. >> heather: what about lessons he can share from this tragedy and since his time in the oval office? >> i think that is very difficult. i'm not sure that those kinds of lessons. he is not a preacher, he is the president for him to be talking about. he is the person that is there comforting and representing the nation in his effort. >> well said. on that point, i'm a little
-- community. that's one thing. the other thing is, in my loneliness moments when i've made transitions, and i made an awful lot transitions in my life, only not only religiously but in terms of the way i think. it has been very important for me to have friends in another place. let's take eboo and me. my sense is that we will remain friends forever. there might be lonely times that i would go through and he would go through in the future, but my conviction i should is that i can reach out and say this is going on, are you still there for me. and i think is really important for all of us to have a network of people who may not be immediately in our community, that we can touch the e-mail or mail or something like that. >> yeah, thank you for that. so, so one of the things we tried to do, actually what we do at iyc is where very deliberate about building that community. so interfaith leadership institute our time will we're bringing together 100, 150 students together on the campus helping them see themselves as interfaith leaders. training them, and basically setting that up to say we promise
fully and exquisitely read except through a piece of literary fiction? desire, loneliness, the search for justice and for just one thing that is lucky or fair. these are some of the timeless themes literature has explored from the beginning and this year is no exception. the finalists are, juno diaz, this is how you lose her. [applause] published by riverhead books and penguin group usa. dave eggers, a hologram for the king. [applause] published by -- books. luis louise erdrich, the roundhouse. published by harper. an imprint of harpercollins. ben johnson, published by ecco press, an imprint of harpercollins. kevin powers, the yellow birds. published by little brown. [applause] the 2012 national book award for fiction goes to the roundhouse by louise erdrich. [applause] ♪ hey baby, where are you? [applause] ♪ >> well met. hello, my relatives. the national book foundation and also the judges are two ways to shout out for all of the native people who are watching this livestream. [applause] i want to thank harpercollins. it is not even a huge company anymore. [laughter] but it has a
? desire, loneliness, the hobbled search for justice and for just one thing that is lucky or fair, these are some of the timeless themes literature has explored from the beginning, and this year is no exception. the finalists are junot diaz, this is how you lose her. [cheers and applause] finish -- published by riverhead books, an imprint of pepping win group -- penguin group with, usa. dave egger, a hologram for the king -- [applause] published by mcsweeny's books. louise erdrich, the round house, published by harper, an imprint of harpercollins. [applause] ben fountain, billy lynn's long -- [inaudible] [applause] published by echo press, an imprint of harpercollins. kevin powers, the yellow bird. published by little brown. [applause] the 2012 national book award for fiction dose -- goes to "the round house", by louise erdrich. [applause] ♪ ♪ hey, baby, where are you is? [laughter] [applause] [laughter] >> wow. hello, my relatives. [speaking in native tongue] national book foundation and also the judges, and a shout out for all of the native people who are watching this live
him from a painful past. >> loneliness. isolation. i probably would have already passed away. >> reporter: without this? >> yeah. >> reporter: this keeps you alive? >> i think it saved my life. >> reporter: and there is gratitude for the generosity. jack the bike man making christmas in florida seem a little warmer. >>> the hottest ticket right now is the soon to be vacant senate seat in massachusetts. we will dig into who is lining up to run. that is next. 7 you know how painful heartburn can be. for fast, long lasting relief, use doctor recommended gaviscon®. only gaviscon® forms a protective barrier that helps block stomach acid from splashing up- relieving the pain quickly. try fast, long lasting gaviscon®. plus the perfecting color of a bb cream equal? introducing the newest beauty trend. total effects cc cream c for color. c for correction. [ female announcer ] fight 7 signs of aging flawlessly. cc what's possible. can i still ship a gift in time for christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress.
loneliness matched only by the fear it inspired far and wide. you see, the minotaur had a voracious appetite which can only be satiated with flesh. this guaranteed the king's reign. the king, who secured peace, the one who enabled trade to crisscross the seas with bountiful ships and spread prosperity around the world. alas, the beast's appetite could only be satiated by human flesh. every now and then by ship loaded with young slaves was -- with youngsters saved from far away athens bound for crete to deliver its human tribute to be devoured by the minotaur. a gruesome ritual that was essential for preserving the peace and producing trade and prosperity. many years later a global minotaur rose up from the ashes of the first postwar phase, the one created by america from the ashes of the war. it is there -- a form of labyrinth was greeted deep in the american economy. it of the form of the united states trade deficit which consumes the world's exports. the more the deficit grew, the greater its appetite for europe and asia as capital, and what made it truly global with its function. it took
's not think that this is a warning sign. it certainly is not. it's the isolation. it's a loneliness, the awkwardness, that means he doesn't have close people near him to help him get through the hard times. he doesn't have people to share his issues and problems with. he doesn't have others around him to help him get perspective of what he's feeling and thinking. >> then again we should say the brilliance has been identified by people who knew him. of course we don't have iq tests to compare this. to however, with regard to a motive, no sort of manifesto or note at this point the police say was found. what does that tell you if it ends up there was nothing left? >> most mass murderers do not leave notes behind. some have done that and some have sent letters to the press before their rampages, some have made videos explaining to the world what they were going to do so the world doesn't misunderstand them. and they don't get mistreated in the press. but for someone who's isolated like this, for someone who's quiet and reserved and shy, it would not be his style to wish to communicate
that they are living the christmas message by uniting their own sufferings and their own loneliness to the sufferings of jesus because they have understood what this christmas is all about, what the message is all about. so no matter where you are, no matter what you're doing, christmas is able to be lived, it's able to be lived deeply, and that brings deep and lasting joy. the presents are good, too. >> ainsley: if you do believe in christ what, a celebration in heaven that they're having, birthday party. >> that's right. >> rick: thank you very much for getting up. >> i'm off to my own church. >> ainsley: i know off busy day. thanks, good to see you. >> rick: coming up, this adorable dog was thrown out of a moving car and left to die. but he survived and this morning another christmas miracle for little joey. >> ainsley: then attention, procrastinators! you still need to get that gift for your in-laws or girlfriend or boyfriend? the perfect present that you don't even have to leave your house for, it's coming up next. ♪ ♪ with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for hi
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)